UN Security Council meeting sought over NKorea missile test



    UN Security Council meeting sought over NKorea missile test

    Feb.12, Seoul: The United States, Japan and South Korea have requested urgent diplomatic talks at the United Nations on Monday over North Korea's latest ballistic missile launch, with Seoul condemning what it called "serious military and security threats" and predicting more such tests.

    A spokesman for the U.S. Mission to the United Nations said Sunday night that the meeting is expected to take place Monday. The spokesman spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly.

    The U.N. Mission for Ukraine, which holds the rotating Security Council presidency, later confirmed that closed consultations on North Korea will take place late Monday afternoon.

    The banned missile test is seen as an implicit challenge to U.S. President Donald Trump, who has vowed a tough line on Pyongyang but has yet to release a strategy for dealing with a country whose nuclear ambitions have bedeviled U.S. leaders for decades.

    North Korean state media said leader Kim Jong Un was at the site to observe the launch and expressed pleasure at the North's expansion of its strategic strike capabilities.

    "These are serious military and security threats," Jeong Joon-hee, spokesman at the Ministry of Unification, told reporters. "Pyongyang has no intention of backing away from its goal to become a country with nuclear weapons."

    A report on the launch carried early Monday by the North's Korean Central News Agency said Kim watched from an observation post and gave the order to fire the "Pukguksong-2," which it said was a "Korean style new type strategic weapon system."

    It is believed to have flown about 500 kilometers (310 miles) before splashing down into the ocean in international waters.

    The report said the test proved "the reliability and security" of a new mobile launching system, the solid fuel that was used and the guidance and control features of the ballistic missile. Solid fuel can give missiles longer range and make detecting them before launch more difficult because they can be readied faster than liquid fuel missiles.

    The report also said the test verified control and guidance capabilities and said the missile can be "tipped with a nuclear warhead."

    It suggested the launch conducted in a "lofted" style, which puts the missile into a high trajectory rather than a lower one that gives it more range, in order take "the security of the neighboring countries into consideration."

    The Oslo Times International News Network

     
     

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