UK raises terror level



    UK raises terror level

    London, May 24: The UK terror threat level has been raised to its highest level of "critical", meaning further attacks may be imminent, Theresa May has said.

    The move came after investigators were unable to rule out whether Manchester bombing suspect Salman Abedi acted alone, the prime minister said. Military personnel will now be deployed to protect key sites.

    Twenty-two people were killed and 59 injured when a suicide bomber attacked Manchester Arena on Monday evening.
    The prime minister said soldiers would be placed in key public locations to support armed police in protecting the public.
    Military personnel may also be seen at other events over the coming weeks, such as concerts, Mrs May said, working under the command of police officers.

    The prime minister said she did not want the public to feel "unduly alarmed" but said it was a "proportionate and sensible response".
    Saffie Roussos and Georgina CallanderMet Police Assistant Commissioner Mark Rowley, who is the national counter-terrorism policing lead, said the investigation was "fast-moving and making good progress"."However, a critical line of inquiry is whether the dead terrorist was acting alone or part of a group," he said.

    "We still have critical lines of inquiry they're chasing down which has led to a level of uncertainty."The first time the threat level was raised to critical was in 2006 during a major operation to stop a plot to blow up transatlantic airliners with liquid bombs.


    Media captionPhil Dick describes on PM how he took care of an injured young girl while searching for his own children
    Thousands of people turned out for the vigil in Manchester and to hold a minute's silence to remember those who died.
    Home Secretary Amber Rudd, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn and Commons Speaker John Bercow stood on stage alongside Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham and Greater Manchester Police Chief Constable Ian Hopkins.

    Vigils have been held elsewhere, including in Birmingham, where the event was interrupted after a man apparently armed with a large knife and a baseball bat was detained nearby.
    The arena bombing is the worst terrorist attack in the UK since the 7 July bombings in 2005, in which 52 people were killed by four suicide bombers.

    Witnesses at the arena described seeing metal nuts and bolts among the debris of Monday's bomb, and spoke about the fear and confusion that gripped concert-goers.



    The Oslo Times International News Network

     
     

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