The Oslo Times Tribute to King of Rock n Roll Chuck Berry



    1440831202391.jpg By Prabalta Rijal
    The Oslo Times Tribute to King of Rock n Roll Chuck Berry

    Mar 19,  Missouri: The king of Rock and Roll Chuck Berry whose songs like "Thirty Days" , have had music lovers swaying to his beats since 1955 has passed away at the age of 90.

    Charles Edward Anderson "Chuck" Berry was an American guitarist, singer and songwriter and one of the pioneers of rock and roll music and arguably the best in the genre who inspired the likes of Elvis Presly and the Beatles was found unresponsive at lunchtime on Saturday, St Charles County police said."Unfortunately, the 90-year-old man could not be revived and was pronounced deceased at 1:26pm," the statement continued."The St. Charles County Police Department sadly confirms the death of Charles Edward Anderson Berry Sr., better known as legendary musician Chuck Berry."

    Berry had become an instant hit in the fifties with his songs like Havana Moon,Brown eyed handsome man and his tribute to Rock and Roll music with his guitar swinging that went, that is why I go for Rock and Roll music if you want to dance with me.....  In this particular song he made playful jabs at jazz, mambo and tango, styles that were popular at the time, and clearly outlined what rock was, from its backbeat to its wailing saxes. "I was heavy into rock & roll even then and had to create something that hit the spot without question," he wrote in his autobiography. "I wanted the lyrics to define every aspect of its being and worded it to do so." It was such a potent summary, the song was covered by the Beatles in 1964 and the Beach Boys in 1976.

    Similarly, his numbers like Oh Carol remain popular even today as millions of youngsters still dedicate it to their first love, a down right romantic by heart Berry had sung this song for a girl he liked in highschool. According to his autobiography, the real life situation in his high school days had helped him greatly in the writing of the song. "Discussing her teenage environment with Francine was much help in putting 'Carol' together," he wrote. "Details from my schooling like meat-loaf and potatoes costing only 5 cents and a notebook with paper for 12 cents were far outdated. Whereas some guy stealing another boy's girl was a thing that hadn't changed any."

    Berry's Groovy numbers since the 50's:

    "Thirty Days" (1955)

    "Wee Wee Hours" (1955)

    "Down Bound Train" (1955)


    "Too Much Monkey Business" (1956)


    "Brown Eyed Handsome Man" (1956)

    "Havana Moon" (1956)


    "Rock and Roll Music" (1957)

    "School Days" (1957)

    "Johnny B. Goode" (1958)

    "Carol" (1958)

    "Around and Around" (1958)

    "Little Queenie" (1959)



    "Back in the U.S.A." (1959)
     

    "You Never Can Tell"

    "No Particular Place to Go" (1964)

    "Tulane" (1970)


    "Reelin' and Rockin'" (1972)

    Sadly, the legend bid goodbye to his fans before the release of his latest album Chuck in 2017, which was put together to celebrate his birth year.
    It was recorded in various studios around St. Louis and features Berry’s longtime hometown backing group – including his children Charles Berry Jr. (guitar) and Ingrid Berry (harmonica), plus Jimmy Marsala (Berry’s bassist of forty years), Robert Lohr (piano), and Keith Robinson (drums) – which has supported him for over two decades on over two hundred residency shows at the famed Blueberry Hill club. “This record is dedicated to my beloved Toddy,” said Berry, referring to his wifeof 68 years, Themetta Berry. “My darlin’ I’m growing old! I’ve worked on this record for a long time. Now I can hang up my shoes!”, he had said on his Birthday last year while announcing the launch of his final album.

    Achievements:

     Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award--1984
    The inaugural class of Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees--1986
    Awarded a Kennedy Center Honor--2000
    Number #5 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All-Time--2010
    Awarded the first-ever PEN Award for literary excellence in lyric writing-- 2012
    Sweden’s Polar Music Prize--2014.

    Similarly, according to his website Chuck.com--"he was the subject of a widely discussed essay by author Chuck Klosterman predicting that hundreds of years hence, Berry would be singularly synonymous with rock and roll itself, and last month his classic 1973 red Cadillac Eldorado went on display as part of the permanent collection at the Smithsonian’s new National Museum of African American Culture and History."

    Tributes

    The Tributes to the Legendary Singer started pouring in as soon as the news of his sad demse reached the social media 

    Motown legends The Jacksons tweeted: "Chuck Berry merged blues & swing into the phenomenon of early rock'n'roll. In music, he cast one of the longest shadows. Thank You Chuck."

    Singer-songwriter Huey Lewis described him as "maybe the most important figure in all of rock and roll".
    "His music and influence will last forever," he added.

    Beatles drummer Ringo Starr quoted one of Berry's own lyrics on Twitter, saying: "Just let me hear some of that rock 'n' roll music any old way you use it." "I am playing I'm talking about you," he wrote.

    The Oslo Times International News Network

     
     

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